The Music of the King is supported by a huge structure; it's three titanic arms surround the musical life of a complex and capricious court: La Chapelle Royale, La Musique de la Chambre y La Grande Ecurie. Versailles does not miss a day without music. Ensembles with a remarkable expressive power are the reflection of a monarch who can do everything. The music has a determinant impact on the life of the palace, the court it mimics with it's own environment. Every single piece of furniture is decorated in a very ornamented way; any inch of raw material cannot be at sight. The body is hidden in ornamented clothes, wigs, face powder, gloves... Any single inch of skin can be an exhibit. Music is covered by a silky veil in which ornamentation is an inseparable part of it's pronunciation. The Court is like that, a divine theater of semblances. Lambert, Lully, Du Mont, de Lalande, Marais, Charpentier, Couperin... big names, famous composers. Some of them are responsible of the most prestigious orchestras of Europe: Les Vingt-quatre Violons, Les Petit Violons, Les Simphonistes de la Chambre... How would a day in their life be? What instrument would they use? What would they feel when they played in front of the King of France? What would they comment among themselves? Questions that are lost in the corridors of time.
The Music of the King is supported by a huge structure; it's three titanic arms surround the musical life of a complex and capricious court: La Chapelle Royale, La Musique de la Chambre y La Grande Ecurie. Versailles does not miss a day without music. Ensembles with a remarkable expressive power are the reflection of a monarch who can do everything. The music has a determinant impact on the life of the palace, the court it mimics with it's own environment. Every single piece of furniture is decorated in a very ornamented way; any inch of raw material cannot be at sight. The body is hidden in ornamented clothes, wigs, face powder, gloves... Any single inch of skin can be an exhibit. Music is covered by a silky veil in which ornamentation is an inseparable part of it's pronunciation. The Court is like that, a divine theater of semblances. Lambert, Lully, Du Mont, de Lalande, Marais, Charpentier, Couperin... big names, famous composers. Some of them are responsible of the most prestigious orchestras of Europe: Les Vingt-quatre Violons, Les Petit Violons, Les Simphonistes de la Chambre... How would a day in their life be? What instrument would they use? What would they feel when they played in front of the King of France? What would they comment among themselves? Questions that are lost in the corridors of time.
8436556732966

Details

Format: CD
Label: VNTS
Rel. Date: 04/02/2021
UPC: 8436556732966

Dans la Chambre Du Roy
Artist: Dans La Chambre Du Roy / Various
Format: CD
New: Call (512) 474-2500 to check in-store availability $14.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

More Info:

The Music of the King is supported by a huge structure; it's three titanic arms surround the musical life of a complex and capricious court: La Chapelle Royale, La Musique de la Chambre y La Grande Ecurie. Versailles does not miss a day without music. Ensembles with a remarkable expressive power are the reflection of a monarch who can do everything. The music has a determinant impact on the life of the palace, the court it mimics with it's own environment. Every single piece of furniture is decorated in a very ornamented way; any inch of raw material cannot be at sight. The body is hidden in ornamented clothes, wigs, face powder, gloves... Any single inch of skin can be an exhibit. Music is covered by a silky veil in which ornamentation is an inseparable part of it's pronunciation. The Court is like that, a divine theater of semblances. Lambert, Lully, Du Mont, de Lalande, Marais, Charpentier, Couperin... big names, famous composers. Some of them are responsible of the most prestigious orchestras of Europe: Les Vingt-quatre Violons, Les Petit Violons, Les Simphonistes de la Chambre... How would a day in their life be? What instrument would they use? What would they feel when they played in front of the King of France? What would they comment among themselves? Questions that are lost in the corridors of time.