In the music of Bach, the Italian violist Simone Libralon has found a lifelong companion, who 'unfailingly touches that emotional chord we need in the varied and contrasting moments of human experience - a safe haven reserved for intimate spirituality.' His own approach to the suites which Bach wrote while Capellmeister at Weimar, however, is inflected not only by lived experience but also scholarship and a lively sense of performance style: 'I've always thought of the sound of Bach in keyboard-related terms: fresh and light like a harpsichord, with the depth and solemnity of the organ, but sensed throughout as a continuum that conceals great compositional and conceptual complexity.' His new recording of the Suites is accordingly personal and unique; he omits most of the marked repeats and brings a refreshingly flowing pulse to movements which are often interpreted as monuments of reflection such as the Sarabande of the Fifth Suite (here lasting less than a minute and a half). However, his decisions always arise from a sense of each movement's inner character, and his account of the Sixth Suite's Prelude is as spacious as Rostropovich's. In doing so, he further demonstrates the imperishable quality of music which absorbs and reflects an almost infinite multiplicity of interpretations while conveying the different character of the artists who channel Bach's inspiration.
In the music of Bach, the Italian violist Simone Libralon has found a lifelong companion, who 'unfailingly touches that emotional chord we need in the varied and contrasting moments of human experience - a safe haven reserved for intimate spirituality.' His own approach to the suites which Bach wrote while Capellmeister at Weimar, however, is inflected not only by lived experience but also scholarship and a lively sense of performance style: 'I've always thought of the sound of Bach in keyboard-related terms: fresh and light like a harpsichord, with the depth and solemnity of the organ, but sensed throughout as a continuum that conceals great compositional and conceptual complexity.' His new recording of the Suites is accordingly personal and unique; he omits most of the marked repeats and brings a refreshingly flowing pulse to movements which are often interpreted as monuments of reflection such as the Sarabande of the Fifth Suite (here lasting less than a minute and a half). However, his decisions always arise from a sense of each movement's inner character, and his account of the Sixth Suite's Prelude is as spacious as Rostropovich's. In doing so, he further demonstrates the imperishable quality of music which absorbs and reflects an almost infinite multiplicity of interpretations while conveying the different character of the artists who channel Bach's inspiration.
5028421964256
Six Suites For Viola Solo (2pk)
Artist: J Bach .S. / Libralon
Format: CD
New: Call (512) 474-2500 to check in-store availability $12.99
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In the music of Bach, the Italian violist Simone Libralon has found a lifelong companion, who 'unfailingly touches that emotional chord we need in the varied and contrasting moments of human experience - a safe haven reserved for intimate spirituality.' His own approach to the suites which Bach wrote while Capellmeister at Weimar, however, is inflected not only by lived experience but also scholarship and a lively sense of performance style: 'I've always thought of the sound of Bach in keyboard-related terms: fresh and light like a harpsichord, with the depth and solemnity of the organ, but sensed throughout as a continuum that conceals great compositional and conceptual complexity.' His new recording of the Suites is accordingly personal and unique; he omits most of the marked repeats and brings a refreshingly flowing pulse to movements which are often interpreted as monuments of reflection such as the Sarabande of the Fifth Suite (here lasting less than a minute and a half). However, his decisions always arise from a sense of each movement's inner character, and his account of the Sixth Suite's Prelude is as spacious as Rostropovich's. In doing so, he further demonstrates the imperishable quality of music which absorbs and reflects an almost infinite multiplicity of interpretations while conveying the different character of the artists who channel Bach's inspiration.