In-Stores

In-Stores At Waterloo


Monday, April 6th at 5pm

Sun Radio 100.1 presents...Ray Wylie Hubbard

Album: The Ruffians Misfortune

When it comes to down ’n’ dirty roots ’n’ roll, nobody in the wide world of Americana music today does it better than Ray Wylie Hubbard. From his humble beginnings as an Oklahoma folkie in the ’60s to his wild ride through the ’70s progressive country movement, and onward through the honky-tonk fog of the ’80s to his sobriety-empowered comeback as a song-writer’s songwriter in the ’90s, Hubbard was already a bonafide legend by the time he really found his groove right at the turn of the century. Beginning with 2001’s aptly-titled Eternal and Lowdown through to his latest and greatest release, 2015’s The Ruffian’s Misfortune, he has spent well over a decade now chasing hellhounds through muddy waters and deep into the underbelly of the blues, with a Lightnin’ Hopkins gleam in his eyes and a Rolling Stones swagger in his step


Tuesday, April 7th at 5pm

East Cameron Folkcore

Album: Kingdom of Fear

East Cameron Folkcore wants to bring back a sense of social consciousness that they feel has been missing from much of today’s music. Formed in the Northeast Austin neighborhood that they’re named after, the eight-piece orchestral group pieces together folk, country, blues and punk to create a unique sound that represents the poor and downtrodden while expressing the disgruntled and under employed youth they have found themselves a part of.
 
The fourteen songs on Kingdom of Fear are divided into four chapters, perfectly split for the double-vinyl edition of the album. Starting with The Grand Illusion, the view then focuses Through The Looking Glass before the people raise their voices (The People Speak) until finally, the Ship Of Fools casts off, ending the record and the story. You have to experience this record in it’s entirety. The one who skips or compiles will lose the whole thing. The introduction, “What The Thunder Said“ serves as a view to what happens in the next hour: The songs of the record merge without rests, repeat musical motifs and recycle lines which came up before.

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